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Rob Zombie & Marilyn Manson at Ak-Chin Pavilion

August 26 @ 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm

The longtime frontman for industrial metal superstars White ZombieRob Zombie was born Robert Bartleh Cummingson January 12, 1966, in Haverhill, Massachusetts, forming the group soon after moving to New York City circa 1985. He subsequently worked as a bike messenger, porn magazine art director, and production assistant for the classic children’s TV series Pee Wee’s Playhouse, concurrently leading White Zombie through a series of cult-favorite indie releases; the success of their 1992 major-label debut, La Sexorcisto: Devil Music, Vol. 1, not only launched Zombie to new prominence within the music industry, but also allowed him to try his hand at animation (most notably a hallucinatory sequence of the feature film Beavis & Butt-Head Do America) and directing (he was slated to helm the third chapter of The Crow franchise, working from his own screenplay, but Miramax Films eventually pulled out of the deal).

In mid-1998, Zombie made his solo debut with the album Hellbilly Deluxe. When it sold more copies in its first week of release than any White Zombie record before it, he disbanded the group to move on as a full-time solo act, quickly issuing Hellbilly remix album American Made Music to Strip By in the fall of 1999. Starting his own label, Zombie-a-Go-Go Records, he gave bands like the Ghastly Ones a home while creating demented mix CDs like Halloween Hootenanny. He delivered remixes to a number of soundtracks while recording a new song for the Mission Impossible: 2 soundtrack, and he rounded out his first major solo run with a Rob Zombie toy produced by Todd McFarlane.

He began to work on a feature film in April of 2000, funded by Universal Studios after he designed a horror display for their amusement parks. The film, House of 1000 Corpses, was produced and edited, but the studio backed out due to its own corporate standards. Zombie wrangled the rights to the film from the studio while taking out his frustrations on his next solo record, Sinister Urge. Again working with collaborator Scott Humphrey (who had produced his first record), he drafted in a metal superstar cast including Ozzy OsbourneSlayer guitarist Kerry KingMötley Crüe/Methods of Mayhem drummer Tommy Lee, and Limp Bizkit‘s DJ Lethal. The record was another success, leading to a huge Christmas tour with Osbourne at the end of 2001 and another solo tour in the spring of 2002.

Zombie sold House of 1000 Corpses to MGM for a Halloween release, although offers from several smaller studios had to be refused because of the financial loss he would have taken. The film was a cult hit, prompting Zombie to begin work on his next piece of celluloid, 2005’s Devil’s Rejects. He returned to the recording studio in 2006 for Educated Horses, which veered down a more experimental path that included blues guitar, acoustic tracks, and even a sitar. Despite debuting in the Top Ten of the Billboard album charts and receiving a Grammy nomination for “The Lords of Salem,” it was his first album not to receive certification from the RIAA. A pair of best-of collections — including hits from both White Zombie and his solo discography — were released that year.

After a stint as director and co-writer of the 2007 remake of Halloween, Zombie Live, his first live album, was released in October 2007, the same month that he began an arena tour with Ozzy Osbourne. The release of his next studio album was pushed back due to Zombie‘s involvement with Halloween II and in 2010, Zombie released Hellbilly Deluxe 2, his first solo album written with the help of his band (which featured John 5 and Piggy D.). Intended as a sequel to his breakout solo debut, it was supported by Zombie‘s first world tour in a decade. Another remix album, Mondo Sex Head, arrived in 2012 and included reworkings from his back catalog by producers like Photek and the Bloody Beetroots.

In early 2013, Zombie returned with his fifth studio album, Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor, which would be Zombie‘s lowest-selling album to date, despite its Top Ten Billboard debut. Months later, his film The Lords of Salem was released in theaters, accompanied by a soundtrack featuring songs by ZombieRush, and the Velvet Underground. In the years that followed, he returned his focus to his horror empire, creating the Great American Nightmare haunted house attraction, which incorporated characters from his cult films. He also began work on another movie, the crowd-funded killer clown flick 31 (which premiered at Sundance in 2016). He also released his first concert film, The Zombie Horror Picture Show, in 2014, followed by his second live album, Spookshow International Live, in 2015.

Zombie‘s sixth studio LP, The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser, was released in April 2016. Featuring an abrasive, industrial edge that hadn’t been heard since Sinister UrgeElectric Warlock was produced by Zeuss and recorded at Goathouse Studios by Zombie and his band, which included former Marilyn Manson bandmates John 5 and Ginger Fish, as well as bassist Piggy D.

Rob Zombie at Ak-Chin Pavilion – July 2016

Iconic rock frontman Marilyn Manson became a mainstream antihero in the ’90s — much to the chagrin of conservative politicians and concerned parents — before settling into a goth elder statesman role in the 2000s with a matured blues-rock reinvention. The self-proclaimed Antichrist Superstar, his vision of dark, arty, industrial metal pushed many of his singles — including “The Dope Show,” “The Beautiful People,” and a cover of Eurythmics‘ “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)” — into the upper reaches of the modern rock charts during the late ’90s and early 2000s.

Born Brian WarnerManson was raised in Canton, Ohio. At the age of 18, he relocated to Tampa Bay, Florida, where he worked as a music journalist. In 1989, he became friends with guitarist and fellow outsider Scott Mitchell; the two soon decided to form a band, with Mitchell rechristening himself Daisy Berkowitz and Warner adopting the name Marilyn Manson. With the addition of bassist Gidget Geinand keyboardist Madonna Wayne-Gacy, the group — originally dubbed Marilyn Manson & the Spooky Kids — began self-releasing cassettes and playing gigs, their gothic stage show notable for Manson‘s elaborate makeup and homemade special effects. Jettisoning their drum machine in favor of Sara Lee Lucas, the band’s sound began taking on a harder edge, and by 1992 they were among the most popular acts in the South Florida area.

In 1993, Nine Inch Nails‘ Trent Reznor came calling, offering both a contract with his Nothing Records label as well as the chance to open for NIN the following spring; Mansonaccepted both offers, and the group’s debut LP, Portrait of an American Family, appeared during the summer of 1994. With new bassist Twiggy Ramirez replacing Gein, the group’s notoriety began to soar. Most infamously, during an appearance in Salt Lake City, Manson ripped apart a copy of the Book of Mormon while on-stage. The Church of Satan’s founder, Anton LaVey, also bestowed upon him the title of “Reverend,” further stoking conservatives’ fears.

Manson‘s cult following continued to swell, and the band broke into the mainstream with the release of 1995’s Smells Like Children EP, propelled by their hit cover of Eurythmics‘ “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This).” Berkowitz quit a short time later and was replaced by guitarist Zim Zum, and the revised group saw their next LP, 1996’s Antichrist Superstar, debut at the number three spot on the pop album charts and sell nearly two million copies in the U.S. alone. Produced by Trent Reznor, the multi-platinum Antichrist Superstarbecame the band’s most influential and defining statement. As Manson‘s popularity grew, so did the furor surrounding him. His concerts were regularly picketed by civic groups, and his music was the subject of widespread attacks from right-wing and religious fronts.

Manson continued to ruffle feathers in 1998 with the glam-inspired Mechanical Animals, which included cover art depicting the singer as a naked androgynous alien. The album became the band’s first to top the charts and spawned the singles “The Dope Show” and “I Don’t Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me).” While the resulting tour yielded a live album, Last Tour on Earth, the trek was cut short in early 1999 after the band was erroneously blamed for influencing the perpetrators of the Columbine High School massacre. Out of respect for the public, the band retreated from the spotlight and returned to the studio.

The third and final part of a thematic album triptych, Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) arrived at the end of 2000, just barely missing the Top Ten. One of Manson‘s most sprawling conceptual pieces, Holy Woodincluded the singles “Disposable Teens” and “The Fight Song.” The band returned to the road and toured to support the album during much of 2001. That December, Manson‘s version of “Tainted Love” appeared on the Not Another Teen Moviesoundtrack, becoming an unexpected European chart hit.

Freed from the mythic concepts of his prior trio of albums, Manson found inspiration for his fifth effort in the sounds of burlesque, cabaret, and Weimar-era Germany. The result was 2003’s The Golden Age of Grotesque, which spent a week atop the album charts and ended up on several critics’ year-end Top Ten lists. The following year, Manson released a greatest-hits affair titled Lest We Forget. A symbolic close to the era, the collection covered the highlights of Manson‘s career and included a new cover version of Depeche Mode‘s “Personal Jesus,” whose success helped push the album to gold status in multiple countries. At this point, Manson turned his focus to his watercolor painting and art exhibitions, with subsequent albums taking a more introspective approach.

Late in 2005, the band announced that a new album was nearly finished; however, it wasn’t until 2007 that Eat Me, Drink Me was released. Focused on heartbreak and relationship conflict, the record was largely written, performed, and produced by Manson and guitarist/bassist Tim Skold (ex-KMFDM), who left Marilyn Manson‘s lineup shortly thereafter and was replaced by returning member Twiggy RamirezManson and Ramirez then began writing material for the band’s seventh studio album, The High End of Low, which arrived in spring 2009 and reached number four on the charts.

In 2011, during preparation for the release of the band’s eighth studio album, drummer Ginger Fish announced he had left the group. Later that same year, Manson premiered a short film in support of the album titled Born Villain. The film, directed by actor Shia La Beouf, was not a music video for a specific track, but a stand-alone short. The album Born Villain, featuring the single “No Reflection,” was released in 2012 and debuted inside the Top Ten. One year later, Manson teamed up with score composer Tyler Bates (Guardians of the Galaxy, John Wick, 300) and began recording what would become The Pale Emperor, which saw release early in 2015 on Loma Vista for the U.S. and Cooking Vinyl internationally. Favored by critics as one of the band’s best late-era efforts, the album peaked in the Top Ten of the Billboard 200 and topped the Hard Rock chart. Manson followed The Pale Emperor with another Batescollaboration in 2017. Originally titled Say10, Heaven Upside Down — Manson‘s tenth album — featured the singles “We Know Where You Fucking Live” and “Kill4Me.”