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BUSH * Stone Temple Pilots * The CULT – Revolution 3 Tour at Ak-Chin Pavilion

September 2 @ 6:30 pm - 11:30 pm

Led by guitarist/vocalist Gavin RossdaleBush was the first post-Nirvana British band to hit it big in America. Of course, they became a hit by playing by the grunge rules — they had loud guitars, guttural vocals, stop-start rhythms, and extreme dynamics. Formed in late 1992 by RossdaleBush landed an American record deal before they had a British label. Their debut album, Sixteen Stone, produced by Clive Langer and Alan Winstanley (producers of early-’80s hits by Madnessand Elvis Costello, among others), was released in late 1994 by Interscope Records. By the end of December, Bush‘s “Everything Zen” video had landed in MTV’s Buzz Bin and the album began to take off; by spring of 1995, the record had achieved gold certification. By that time, the band was successful enough in the U.S. to land a British record deal, although they weren’t able to match their American success in the U.K.

Over the course of 1995, Sixteen Stone became a major hit in the U.S., with “Little Things” reaching number four on the modern rock charts in the spring; later that year, “Comedown” and “Glycerine” both reached number one on the modern rock charts, as well as crossing over into the pop Top 40. Despite their success, Bush received scathing reviews from the press and many alternative rock insiders who believed the group was manufactured. To counter such charges, the band asked Steve Albini — notorious for his abrasive productions for not only PixiesNirvana, and PJ Harvey, but also countless indie bands — to helm its second album. The resulting Razorblade Suitcase was released in time for the Christmas season of 1996. The album was greeted with mixed reviews that were nevertheless more positive than those surrounding Sixteen Stone, and the album entered the U.S. charts at number one, and made some headway in the U.K. However, by the spring of 1997, the album had stalled somewhat, producing only one major hit in “Swallowed,” and reaching only double-platinum status.

Deconstructed, a collection of electronic remixes, appeared in late 1997, and in the fall of 1999, Bush returned with The Science of ThingsScience peaked at number 11, but nevertheless managed to go platinum on the backs of singles like “The Chemicals Between Us,” which topped the Billboard Modern Rock chart. In late 2001, they went back to basics with the guitar-driven album Golden State. Although it didn’t storm the charts like previous albums, fans still supported Bush, as was evidenced by their sold-out tour across North America. During this time, Helmet guitarist Chris Traynor was added as a touring member. Shifts within the band, however, took a sharp turn several months later when founding member Nigel Pulsford announced his departure in May. Pulsford, who had started a solo career as well as a new family, left without much drama and disapproval. Traynor stepped in to fill his shoes, but the tour would still be the last for the original Bushlineup. They ultimately disbanded in 2002, with Rossdale returning to music in 2004 with a new project, Institute, as well as a solo album, Wanderlust, in 2008. While a Best Of set (which included a recording of their Woodstock ’99 performance) and Zen X Four (a double-disc live album/music video collection) were issued in 2005, Bush would not be heard from for a decade.

In 2011, after years of planning, Rossdale re-formed Bushwith Traynor, bassist Corey Britz, and founding drummer Robin GoodridgePulsford and Parsons declined to rejoin the band. That year they released the Bob Rock-produced The Sea of Memories, their fifth studio album and first since 2001’s Golden State. The album performed modestly well — lead single “The Sound of Winter” topped Billboard’s Alternative Songs and Rock Songs charts, with the record peaking at 18 on the Billboard 200 — and the group toured behind the record into 2012.

Reinvigorated by being back in the industry, Rossdale returned to the studio almost immediately after coming off tour and began writing another record. The sixth Bush album, Man on the Run, was recorded in 2014 with Nick Raskulinecz and Jay Baumgardner, and released in October of the same year. Bush returned in 2017 with their seventh album, Black and White Rainbows.

Stone Temple Pilots were able to turn alternative rock into stadium rock; naturally, they became the most critically despised band of their era. Accused by many critics of being nothing more than ripoff artists who pilfered from Pearl JamSoundgarden, and Alice in Chains, the bandmates nevertheless became major stars in 1993. And the influence of those bands was apparent in their music, although Stone Temple Pilots did manage to change things around a bit. STPwere more concerned with tight song structure and riffs than punk rage. Their closest antecedents were not the Sex Pistols or Hüsker Dü; instead the band resembled arena rock acts from the ’70s — they made popular hard rock that sounded good on the radio and in concert. No matter what the critics said, Stone Temple Pilots had undeniably catchy riffs and production; there’s a reason why over three million people bought their debut album, Core, and why their second album, Purple, shot to number one when it was released.

Following the success of Purple and its accompanying tour, the band took some time off, during which the group’s lead singer, Scott Weiland, developed a heroin addiction. In the spring of 1995, he was arrested for possession of heroin and cocaine, and was sentenced to a rehabilitation program. Following his completion of the program, Stone Temple Pilotsrecorded their third album. Released in the spring of 1996, Tiny Music…Songs from the Vatican Gift Shop, entered the charts at number four. Shortly after its release, Stone Temple Pilots announced that Weiland had relapsed and entered a drug rehabilitation facility, thereby canceling the group’s plans for a summer tour. Weiland‘s drug problems and the group’s inability to support Tiny Music with a tour meant that the album couldn’t replicate the success of its predecessors — by the end of the summer, it had fallen out of the Top 50 and stalled at platinum, which was considerably less than what the group’s two previous albums achieved.

Still battling his personal demons, Weiland recorded a 1998 solo album, 12 Bar Blues, while the remaining members of STP recruited vocalist Dave Coutts to record a self-titled LP under the band name Talk Show. To the surprise of many, Stone Temple Pilots then reunited, although shortly after completing 1999’s No. 4Weiland was sentenced to a year in a Los Angeles county jail for violating his probation, which stemmed from an earlier conviction for heroin possession. Even so, a newly rejuvenated Stone Temple Pilots and a sober Weiland emerged stronger than ever during the new millennium. The band got back to basics with Shangri-La Dee Da, released in summer 2001. Two years later, STP issued the ambitious greatest-hits package Thank You. The audio-only edition featured 15 tracks — 13 hits spanning the group’s entire career, an acoustic version of “Plush” dating from 1992, and the new track “All in the Suit That You Wear” — while a special CD/DVD format included three hours of videos, live performances, and behind-the-scenes footage.

Stone Temple Pilots took another break between 2003 and 2008, during which time Weiland found renewed success as the frontman of Velvet Revolver. After clashes with his bandmates resulted in his exit from the group, Weilandreunited with STP and embarked on a successful reunion tour in 2008, with ticket sales reportedly totaling $230,000 per show. The band returned to the studio one year later, emerging in 2010 with the release of Stone Temple Pilots, its self-titled sixth album. It reached number two on the U.S. album charts, and the band embarked on a worldwide tour that wound up being documented on the 2011 live video Alive in the Windy CitySTP were planning to continue a tour in 2012, possibly playing their Core debut in its entirety, but these plans fell apart, and on February 27, 2013 the group announced they had fired Weiland.

On the following day, the singer countered that this was all a ruse to boost ticket sales and that lawyers would straighten out the situation, but the remaining members of Stone Temple Pilots soldiered on without him, appearing as a surprise guest on KROQ’s annual Weenie Roast on May 18, 2013. Their new vocalist was Chester Bennington from Linkin Park; he not only performed with the band on May 18 and 19 (the latter was in San Francisco), but he sang lead on the group’s new single, “Out of Time,” which was available for download on May 19, 2013. Bennington toured with the band until 2015, when he returned to his efforts with Linkin Park. Later that year, on December 3, Weiland was found dead in Bloomington, Minnesota while on tour with his band the Wildabouts. Following Bennington‘s departure, Stone Temple Pilots set out to find his replacement by holding auditions online. Before they could announce a new singer, Bennington committed suicide on July 20, 2017.

The band celebrated the 25th anniversary of Core via a Super Deluxe Edition released in September 2017. Shortly afterward, Stone Temple Pilots announced they hired Jeff Gutt — who previously had appeared in the U.S. version of the television musical competition The X Factor — as their new lead singer. The new STP lineup released an eponymous album in March 2018.

Following a succession of name and stylistic changes, the Cult emerged in 1984 as one of England’s leading heavy metal revivalists. Picking up the pseudo-mysticism and Native American obsessions of the Doors, the guitar orchestrations of Led Zeppelin, and the three-chord crunch of AC/DC, while adding touches of post-punk goth rock, the Cult gained a dedicated following in their native Britain with mid-’80s singles like “She Sells Sanctuary” before breaking into the American metal market in the late ’80s with “Love Removal Machine.” Though they managed one Top Ten in America with 1989’s Sonic Templethe Cult were plagued with off-stage tensions and problems that prevented them from retaining their popularity. The band split in 1995 following a pair of unsuccessful records, but returned on an occasional basis for new records — always anchored by vocalist Ian Astbury and guitarist Billy Duffy.

The origins of the Cult lie in the Southern Death Cult, a goth rock outfit formed by vocalist Ian Astbury(born May 14, 1962) in 1981. Astbury was the son of a merchant navy man, which meant he moved frequently during his youth; at one point in his childhood, his family lived in Canada, where the young Astbury became fascinated with Native Americans, who would become a recurring theme in his songwriting. Astbury eventually settled in Bradford, Yorkshire, where he met a group comprising David Burrows (guitar), Barry Jepson (bass), and Haq Quereshi (drums). Ian joined the group as its lead vocalist (performing with the last name of “Lindsay,” which was his mother’s maiden name) and had the group renamed the Southern Death Cult. At only its fifth concert, the band was attracting audiences of 2,000. In December 1982, the Southern Death Cult released their first single — the double A-side “Moya”/”Fatman” — and the following month, they supported Bauhaus on tour. Though the group’s future was looking bright, Astbury pulled the plug on the band because he was frustrated with the positive articles he was receiving in the press. The remaining three members joined Getting the Fear, which eventually became Into a Circle; in the late ’80s, Quereshi became a member of Fun^Da^Mental. All of the Southern Death Cult recordings were eventually released in 1986.

Following the disbandment of the Southern Death CultAstbury shortened the name of the group to Death Cult and recruited guitarist Billy Duffy — who had previously played with Morrissey in the pre-Smiths band the Nosebleeds, as well as Theatre of Hate — and drummer Ray Mondo and bassist Jamie Stewart, who had previously played with RitualDeath Cult released an eponymous EP in the summer of 1983; on the EP, Astbury reverted back to his given name. Later in the year, Mondo was replaced by Nigel Preston, who had previously played with Duffy in Theatre of Hate; coincidentally, Mondo became the drummer for Preston‘s previous band, Sex Gang Children.

In early 1984, the bandmembers decided to excise “Death” from the title, fearing that the word gave them the misleading appearance of being a goth band. Where both Southern Death Cult and Death Cult had been overtly influenced by post-punk, the Cult were a heavy hard rock band with slight psychedelic flourishes. Dreamtime, the group’s first album, was released in the fall of 1984, accompanied by the single “Spiritwalker.” Dreamtime reached number 21 on the U.K. charts. In the spring of 1985, Preston left the group. For the group’s summer single, “She Sells Sanctuary,” the band was joined by Big Country‘s drummer, Mark Brzezicki. “She Sells Sanctuary” became a major U.K. hit, peaking at number 15. During the recording of the group’s second album, drummer Les Warner joined the group. Love, released in the fall of 1985, continued the hard rock direction of its teaser single and became a number four hit in Britain.

For their third album, the Cult shuffled their lineup — Stewartmoved to rhythm guitar, while former Zodiac Mindwarpbassist Kid Chaos joined the lineup — and hired Rick Rubinas producer, and the result, Electric, was their hardest, heaviest record to date. The first single from the album, “Love Removal Machine,” became a number 18 hit in the spring of 1987, while the album itself reached number four in the U.K. upon its April release. Later that year, Electric gained the Culta fan base in America, and the album cracked the U.S. Top 40.

In 1988, the group fired Chaos and Warner, replacing the latter with Matt Sorum; the band failed to hire another bassist. The new lineup released Sonic Temple, which would prove to be the band’s most successful album. The hit single “Fire Woman” helped propel the album into the American Top Ten, and within no time, the Cult were seen hanging out with the likes of Mötley Crüe and Aerosmith, as well as supporting Metallica on the Damaged Justice tour. Though the group was experiencing its best sales, it was fraying behind the scenes, due to infighting and substance abuse. By the time they recorded their follow-up to Sonic TempleSorum had left to join Guns N’ Roses and Stewart had quit; they were replaced by drummer Mickey Curry and bassist Charlie Drayton. The resulting album, Ceremony, was released in the fall of 1991 to weak reviews and disappointing sales.

Following the release of Ceremony, the group took a break for the next three years. In 1993, the band released the U.K.-only hits compilation Pure Cult, which debuted at number one. By summer 1993, the Cult had a new rhythm section, featuring former Mission bassist Craig Adams, second guitarist Mike Dimkich (Channel 3), and drummer Scott Garrett. This lineup recorded The Cult, which was released in late 1994 to poor reviews and sales. In spring 1995, the Cult disbanded, with Ian Astbury forming the Holy Barbarians later in the year. Billy Duffy briefly played with Miles Hunt‘s Vent 414before leaving to pursue a solo project. In 2000, the band’s catalog was remastered and reissued, and Pure Cult was released in the U.S. (despite a similar compilation, High Octane Cult, having appeared four years earlier). It was followed by Rare Cult, a six-disc box set of rarities.

A new Cult, with Matt SorumMartyn LeNoble, and Chris Wyse joining Astbury and Duffy, made their debut in June 1999 at the Tibetan Freedom Festival. This band produced the 2001 album Beyond Good and Evil before the Cult were retired again, as Astbury joined former Doors members Robbie Krieger and Ray Manzarek in the Doors of the 21st Century (later renamed Riders on the Storm). In 2007, it was announced that Astbury had left the band to rejoin Duffy in a new version of the Cult, with Chris Wyse on bass and John Tempesta on drums. They signed to Roadrunner and released Born into This in 2008, which they promoted over the next few years on their highly publicized Love Live tour. They returned to the studio in 2011 after inking a deal with Cooking Vinyl Records and released their ninth studio album, Choice of Weapon, the following year.

In 2013, Duffy announced in an interview that the Cult were working on new material for 2015. However, personnel changes put a bit of a damper on the band’s plans: after 20 years, Dimkich left to play with Bad Religion and Wyse left for Ace Frehley‘s band. Longtime friend James Stevensontook the second guitar chair, while Grant Fitzpatrick took over on bass to play the band’s 2014 world tour. Jane’s Addictionbassist Chris Channey came on board in the studio on the band’s tenth studio album. With Bob Rock producing, the Cult completed Hidden City in 2015. The first two singles, “Dark Energy” and “Deeply Ordered Chaos,” were issued in November and December, respectively, with a third, “Hinterland,” appearing in January of 2016. The album followed in February of that year.

Venue

Ak-Chin Pavilin
2121 N 83rd Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85035 United States
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Phone:
(602) 254-7200
Website:
https://www.livenationvenue.com/akchin-pavilion